Moot Courts and Competitions

The University of Michigan Law School offers law students a wide array of extracurricular opportunities, including moot court and other competitions, to get involved in different aspects of the law.

Contact the Office of Student Life to Learn More

Writing Competitions

  • State Bar of Michigan Taxation Section Law Student Writing Challenge

    The Taxation Section is pleased to announce its third annual Law Student Writing Challenge. Students are asked to write a paper analyzing the tax-related issues in connection with the question below. Challenge participants will be evaluated on their research, analysis, persuasiveness, and writing ability. 

    Prize: The review panels will choose an overall winning entrant to the Challenge who will be awarded a $1,000 cash scholarship. The other three winners will each receive a

    $250 cash scholarship. Each of the four winners will also receive free entry to the 2021 Annual Tax Conference to be held virtually on May 27, 2021, and have their submission considered for publication in the Michigan Tax Lawyer.

    Eligibility: Eligible participants must either:

    1. be enrolled, as of January 1, 2021, and continuing through April 15, 2021, at an ABA-accredited law school that is located in the State of Michigan; or
    2. be enrolled, as of January 1, 2021, and continuing through April 15, 2021, at an ABA-accredited law school that is located anywhere in the United States and, within the last two years, been employed or had an unpaid internship at a Michigan office of a law firm, accounting firm, or governmental agency.

    Format: Each participant must write a response to the challenge question in the form of an email to the client that otherwise conforms to the specifications for submission to the Michigan Tax Lawyer. The response should be no more than 1,500 words. The response itself should not include author information, which will be separately included with the submission packet. The title of the response should be “Law Student Writing Challenge.” Participants are expected to draft their submission independently and without the assistance of others.

    Submissions: Participants must submit their response by email to the Taxation Section’s Program Facilitator, Mary Owiesny, at mowiesny@honigman.com on or before April 30, 2021. The submission must be a single PDF document that includes (1) a cover sheet

    with the student’s name, law school, and contact information, (ii) evidence of their enrollment at a U.S. law school and, if a non-Michigan law school, proof of employment or internship meeting the requirements for eligibility, and (3) their paper.

    Review process: The review process will be conducted by panels of the Taxation Section. The author’s identifying information will not be known by the reviewers during the review. Reviewers will award points to each entry based on, in no particular order, (1) substantive analysis, (2) conciseness, (3) format, (4) writing style, and (5) originality. The selection of the top submissions will be in the sole discretion of the Taxation Section.

    2021 Law Student Writing Challenge Question:

    Your client is Shannon Friendly. She has a job as a graphic designer and earns a salary of $50,000 per year, but is drowning in student loan debt. In 2019, she started a side hustle designing websites for local businesses. It really took off and she had gross receipts of

    $50,000 for that year. She did not know how to claim this income or her $15,000 of business expenses on her tax returns. Her friend, who is a plumber, told her that since it is side-income and not subject to tax withholding, she does not have to include in her tax

    return. He also commented, “it’s not like the IRS is ever going to know you received this money, right?” So, she just left it off of her 2019 tax returns.

    On February 24, 2021, she received a CP2000 notice from the IRS for tax year 2019. The notice informs her that the IRS is assessing her the following: (1) additional income and self-employment taxes of $17,630; (2) interest in the amount of $1,586; (3) a negligence penalty of $3,526; and (4) a penalty for failing to make estimated payments in the amount of $4,407.50. This notice is based on the IRS receiving multiple 1099-MISC from all of Shannon’s clients, which totals $50,000.

    Shannon had no idea that her clients would file 1099-MISC with the IRS. She thought only she got a copy of them. She is very worried that she is in a lot of trouble and is going to lose everything she’s been working so hard for. Shannon thinks it is unfair that they included all of her business income, but did not account for her business expenses. She also had no idea she had to make estimated payments on her side-gig income and doesn’t understand why there is a penalty for something that she did not know about. 

    Write her an email summarizing your plan to respond the notice and deal with the penalties. She will also need to understand the IRS procedures involved in resolving this situation. In addition to advising her on the current mess, your answer should also explain her specific filing and payment obligations in the future.

Moot Court Competitions

  • Henry M. Campbell Moot Court Competition

    The Henry M. Campbell Moot Court Competition has been an annual event at the Law School for more than eighty years. Winning it is one of the highest honors a Michigan law student can achieve.

    The Campbell Competition, open to all interested second- and third-year students, visiting and dual degree students, is a test of the contestants' skills in the art of appellate advocacy, both oral and written. Each year the students who serve on the Campbell Board construct a hypothetical case which involves a topic of current social concern and raises difficult unresolved legal questions. The record of this case is distributed to potential competitors early in the fall semester.

    Participants submit written briefs on the issues of the case and then take part in oral arguments in the preliminary round late in the fall term. Students work in pairs to complete their briefs, but participate individually in oral arguments. Evaluation is based upon both oral and written performance. The quarterfinal round is held early in the winter term, and a semi-final round is held after Spring Break. The top two competitors advance to the final round held in early April. The panel of judges for the final argument includes members of the Federal Bench. All competitors learn a tremendous amount of substantive law while developing written and oral advocacy skills. 

  • Child Welfare Law Moot Court Competition

    The Child Welfare Law Moot Court Competition is a national moot court competition sponsored by five organizations, including the American Bar Association Center on Children and the Law, and the National Association of Counsel for Children. Each school fields a two or three member team which competes in written and oral advocacy on a child welfare issue. Michigan's team is chosen by an intra-Michigan competition organized by the Child Advocacy Law Clinic. The competition is open to all law students.

  • Criminal Law Moot Court Competition

    Each year, the Criminal Law Society selects and coaches a team to compete in the Herbert J. Wechsler National Criminal Moot Court Competition, in Buffalo, NY.

    The Criminal Law Society is led by a five member general executive board. All members of the Law School community are welcome and invited to join.

  • Entertainment Media and Arts Moot Court Competition

    The Entertainment Media and Arts Law Students Association (EMALSA) facilitates a variety of professional, academic, and recreational activities. Members have successfully competed in prestigious national competitions, such as the BMI/Cardozo Entertainment Moot Court Competition and the Grammy Foundation's Entertainment Law Initiative national writing competition.

    EMALSA membership is open to the entire Law School community.

  • Environmental Law Moot Court Competition

    The Environmental Law Society (ELS) is a charter member of the National Association of Environmental Law Societies, consisting of a group of students and faculty advisors dedicated to learning about environmental law and protecting the environment through the legal process. In addition to various environmental projects, ELS members also compete at the Annual Environmental Moot Court Competition hosted by Pace Law School in White Plains, New York.

  • Intellectual Property Moot Court Competition

    The Giles Sutherland Rich Memorial Moot Court competition is the nation's foremost intellectual property moot court competition. The competition is named for the late Honorable Giles Sutherland Rich, a noted jurist and Chief Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit and its predecessor, the Court of Customs and Patent Appeals.

    The competition is a nationwide moot court competition run by the American Intellectual Property Law Association and covers issues involving patents, copyright, trademarks, and trade secrets. The problem is usually released in October, with a University of Michigan round hosted by the Intellectual Property Students Association in January. From this round, the top two-member teams travel to the regional competition in Chicago, with the finals taking place in April at the Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit in Washington, DC.

  • Jessup International Law Moot Court Competition

    The Jessup International Law Moot Court Competition is an international moot court competition between law schools in over fifty countries. Each school fields a five-member team which competes in written and oral advocacy on an international law topic. Michigan's team is chosen by an intra-Michigan competition organized by the International Law Society.

    The competition is open to all law students. The five-member team travels first to the Regional Round and then (hopefully) on to the finals, which have been held at various universities throughout the world. The Michigan team won the United States competition in 1998. The Law School's International Law Society supervises and coaches the Michigan team, which has consistently done very well in competition.

  • Native American Law Students Association Moot Court Competition

    The Native American Law Students Association (NALSA) strives to increase communication among Native American law students, Native American lawyers and the general public. In support of this goal, NALSA provides a forum at the University of Michigan for the discussion and exploration of legal problems affecting Native Americans. NALSA serves as an information source for Native American law students on educational financial assistance, educational opportunities, and employment opportunities. Members have successfully competed in the annual National NALSA Moot Court Competition.

    NALSA membership is open to the entire Law School community.

Other Competitions

  • Client Counseling Competition

    Each year, the Office of Student Life hosts the American Bar Association Law Student Division Client Counseling Competition. This competition helps students develop interviewing, planning, and analytical skills necessary to the lawyer-client relationship by simulating a law office consultation in which law students, acting as attorneys, conduct interviews with people playing the roles of clients and then explain how they would proceed further in the hypothetical situations.

    A workshop and competition training session covering interviewing and counseling principles is held each year prior to the competition, usually in the fall term. All interested students are welcome to attend the workshop, but those who wish to participate in the competition must attend the training. The workshop usually takes place one to two weeks prior to the competition.

    The Client Counseling Competition focuses on various areas of law from year to year. Recent areas of law have been human rights/civil liberties, professional responsibility, and torts law.

  • Legal Skills Workshops and Competitions

    In recognition of the need to develop professional skills in environments beyond the classroom, several activities are sponsored each year at the Law School. These include workshops to develop client counseling and negotiation skills, and intra-school competitions in client counseling, appellate, and trial advocacy. The Law School sends the intra-school champions to the American Bar Association's Regional Client Counseling competitions every year. Recently the Michigan team was a national client counseling finalist. Michigan has also served as the host of the regional client counseling competition.

Student Organizations

The faculty and administration of the Law School do not monitor or control the material or links included in student-maintained homepages. We do, however, encourage student organizations to follow the general formatting conventions of the Law School website, and to provide links back into the "official" area, for the convenience of browsers.

  • 1L Oral Advocacy Competition

    The primary goal of the Michigan Law School 1L Oral Advocacy Competition is to give students an opportunity to practice and hone their oral appellate advocacy skills during their first year. By providing this experience in a low-stress environment, the competition encourages 1Ls to participate even if they have no prior debate, mock trial, or public speaking experience. The 1L Oral Advocacy Competition is unique among top law schools.

    A small group of prior participants organizes the competition every year. The competition is centered around a closed-universe packet, designed by the board, and is based on an equivocal constitutional question. Upperclassmen are the judges in the early rounds of the competition, and feedback is provided to1Ls after every round of the competition in order to help students rapidly improve their skills. In the later rounds, professors and practicing attorneys judge the arguments. The competition also organizes networking and learning events for its participants. Practicing attorneys from the country's best law firms and public interest organizations travel to the University to give advice about advocacy. 

    The competition requires little time investment from the 1L class. No participation is required in the Fall semester. The competition usually starts in early February, with informational events beginning in January.

    To learn more about the 1L Oral Advocacy Competition​, please contact us via email at oac-board@umich.edu

  • ACLU at the University of Michigan Law School

    The purpose of the ACLU-UMLS is to facilitate law student engagement with civil liberties and the protection of rights in the community through education and advocacy opportunities. We cover a variety of civil rights issues, including: immigration, freedom of speech & assembly, voting rights, reproductive rights, privacy and technology, the right to education, disability rights, and racial justice.

    To learn more about the ACLU at the University of Michigan Law School, please contact us via email at aclu-board@umich.edu

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    ACLU Michigan

  • American Constitution Society

    The American Constitution Society (ACS) is a group dedicated to countering the pervasive conservative orthodoxy in American law and politics. ACS is founded upon certain fundamental principles: compassion, justice, and respect for human dignity. Through forums, speakers, and debate, ACS hopes to bring this form of discourse both to the University of Michigan Law School and to the surrounding community.

    To learn more about the American Constitution Society, please contact us via email at acsboard@umich.edu.

  • Art, Museums, and Cultural Heritage Law Society

    The Art, Museums, and Cultural Heritage Law Society (AMCHLS) is a group of University of Michigan law students interested in promoting the preservation and protection of cultural heritage in the United States and internationally through legal education and advocacy in the legislative, judicial, and policy arenas. The organization is also interested in hosting events and facilitating discussions related to art law, museums, and its intersection with other disciplines such as anthropology and history.

    The purpose of the AMCHLS is to create an academic, professional, and social forum for individuals interested in this growing area of law. In recent years, activities such as looting, museum theft, and illicit antiquities trading have increasingly garnered domestic and international legal attention. AMCHLS will foster education and exploration of these and other cultural heritage law issues through a variety of activities, including:

    • Guest lectures by experts from the legal, academic, and political arenas.
    • Networking opportunities with fellow students, alumni, and professionals.
    • Social excursions to museums, galleries, and historic sites.
    • Participation in national scholarship and competitions.

    Current members are or have been involved in many aspects of the art, museums, and cultural heritage law profession, including:

    • Conducting research and writing papers on art history and art law.
    • Continuing their own artistic endeavors.
    • Curatorial internships with teaching museums and leading national art museums.
    • Copywriting for the Collegiate Journal of Art.
    • Creating a digital topographic database of Rome over the course of its history.
    • Archival and exhibit work with rare book libraries and national museums.
    • Working with nonprofits dedicated to cultural heritage preservation.

    Previous members have also interned for the legal departments of major auction houses and published articles in art law journals. Members are passionate about a diverse array of subjects relating to art and cultural heritage law, and aim to encourage scholarly discussion about the field.

    To learn more about AMCHLS, please contact us via e-mail at lawcultureboard@umich.edu.

  • Asia Law Society

    The Asia Law Society (ALS) at the University of Michigan Law School keeps as its core mission the exchange of legal knowledge across vast boundaries, and a bridging of academic and legal knowledge to gain a unique perspective on the region. ALS serves as a forum where students with an interest in legal, political, and economic developments in Asia can come together to share thoughts, exchange information, and build contacts. ALS also aims to generate interest and raise awareness throughout the University community about the exciting legal developments taking place in Asia today. ALS-sponsored meetings and events are open to all graduate and professional school students.

    To learn more about the Asia Law Society, please contact us via e-mail at asialawboard@umich.edu

  • Asian Pacific American Law Students Association

    The Asian Pacific American Law Students Association (APALSA) serves as an academic, social, and political resource for Asian students in the Law School. In recent years, APALSA has made itself increasingly visible to the administration and has strengthened its voice in efforts to redefine the role of Asian Pacific Americans both in the Law School and in the law.

    APALSA has coordinated efforts within the Law School and among student organizations to educate the community about political issues such as affirmative action, representation of 9/11 detainees, and hate crimes.

    APALSA also sponsors social events throughout the year, and provides both social and academic support to incoming 1Ls and transfer students through its mentoring program. APALSA has a strong tradition of reaching out to the community. We have hosted a university-wide basketball tournament to raise money for charity, a Minority Bone Marrow Drive, and volunteered at neighborhood soup kitchens. As part of its recruiting efforts, each year APALSA hosts a panel advising undergraduate Asian students on applying to law school. It has worked closely with the Admissions Office to ensure that Asian students continue to be a visible and active presence throughout the Law School, and has hosted events during Preview Weekends to meet prospective Asian Michigan Law School students.

    To learn more about APALSA, please contact us via email at apalsaeboard@umich.edu. For more information about APALSA, please visit our website. The organization is open to all students who share its mission. 

  • Bankruptcy Law Society

    The Bankruptcy Law Society (BLS) provides a forum for law students and others in the university who are interested in all facets of bankruptcy law, including creditor rights, business reorganization, out of court workouts, sovereign debt defaults, liquidation, and individual debtor bankruptcy. BLS hosts guest speakers with expertise in this field, organizes Michigan Law students to participate in bankruptcy moot court competitions and conferences, and with a goal of promoting community service initiatives to help low-income individuals or struggling small businesses access bankruptcy counseling.

    To learn more about the Bankruptcy Law Society, please contact us via email at blseboard@umich.edu

  • Black Law Students Association

    The Black Law Students Association (BLSA) is a professional organization of Black law students committed to furthering the academic, professional, and cultural needs and goals of the Black students at the Law School. As an affiliate of the National Black Law Students Association (NBLSA), our chapter focuses on sensitizing the legal community to the needs of the Black community, promoting the professional needs of Black law students, and assisting in the recruitment, retention, and placement of Black students.

    We are organized to empower Black law students with the knowledge and resources to be successful students, mentors, and professionals in the legal community. Through the use of social interaction and programming geared largely towards scholarship, career development, and community involvement, BLSA fosters academic achievement, community engagement, and, ultimately, the development of strong Black leadership in the legal profession.

    To learn more about the Black Law Students Association, please email us at mblsa-leaders@umich.edu and visit our website. The organization is open to all students who share its mission.

  • Business Law Association

    The Business Law Association (BLA) was organized to help graduate students pursue academic, professional, and social opportunities arising from the nexus of law and business. BLA exposes its members to interdisciplinary issues affecting both law and business, and fosters interaction between the Law and Business Schools at the University of Michigan, as well as between students, faculty, and professionals within the fields. Some of the ways in which BLA accomplishes its goals include networking events for students and alumni, members-only career panels and opportunities, a speaker series on topics in business and law, the facilitation of cross-registration between the Law and Business Schools, and social opportunities that bring together law and business students. 

    To learn more about the Business Law Association, please email us at blaexecboard@umich.edu

  • California Law Students Association

    The California Law Students Association (CALSA) is committed to developing a social, intellectual, and professional environment for students interested in the California legal market through events, specific job resources, panels, speakers, and mentoring programs. CALSA strives to: 

    • Provide a forum for cultural exchange and integration.
    • Support students who desire to start or continue their legal career in California through networking opportunities and peer mentorship.
    • Guide members through California’s legal landscape, providing job resources to help students identify employment opportunities. 
    • Foster long-lasting professional relationships with alumni working in California and build Michigan Law’s visibility in the California legal market.

    To learn more about the California Law Students Association, please email us at calsa-board@umich.edu

  • Catholic Law Students Association

    The Catholic Law Students Association (CLSA) is a student organization at the University of Michigan Law School that provides a variety of social, religious, and community volunteer activities for the whole Law School Student Body. The organization may present speakers, sponsor panel discussions, dine together from time to time, sponsor or attend Mass together, facilitate volunteer services in the community, discuss the social teachings of the Church, participate in inter-faith activities, and sponsor various socials. Participation by Catholics and non-Catholics alike is welcomed and encouraged. 

    To learn more about the Catholic Law Students Association, please email us at clsaboard@umich.edu. For more information about CLSA, please visit our website

  • Christian Legal Society

    The Christian Legal Society (CLS) seeks to provide Christian community to law school students. Our mission is to love, encourage, and equip one another, individually and in community, and to proclaim, love, and serve Jesus Christ through our studies, professional preparation, and within our legal community. We host discussion groups exploring what it means to be a Christian in the legal profession, fellowship lunches, prayer meetings, service projects, and Bible studies. We also host speakers to engage the student body in discussions related to the intersection of faith and the law. All these activities serve as opportunities for law students to get to know each other and build community.

    To learn more about the Christian Legal Society, please email us at LeadCLS@umich.edu.

  • Classical Music Society

    The Classical Music Society serves as both a music appreciation and a music performance society that functions a little like a symphony board. We are committed to hosting recitals by law school student body musicians. The Society provides resources for students who want to play music, who want to attend classical concerts with friends, and/or who want behind-the-scenes experience organizing recitals. 

    To learn more about the Classical Music Society, please email us at classicalmusicsocietyboard@umich.edu

  • Compost Michigan

    This student group is dedicated to promoting and executing a lunch-event composting program at the University of Michigan Law School. This entails ordering compostable materials, making those materials available to student leaders, instructing student leaders and the law school community on how to compost, and coordinating with the University's waste management program. The group also educates the law school community on composting and works to expand resources and opportunities for students to decrease waste. 

    Further, Compost Michigan promotes composting and zero-waste events through coordination with the Law School's administration, the Lawyer's Club's administration, and various University offices. 

    To learn more about Compost Michigan, please email us at compostmichiganboard@umich.edu. For more information, please view our website.

  • Consumer Advocacy & Financial Regulation Organization

    The Consumer Advocacy and Financial Regulation Organization (CAFRO) is a student-led group focused on the role of financial regulation in promoting a fair market for businesses and consumers. The group engages on a range of issues, including antitrust, fintech, securities regulation, consumer protection, and market enforcement. CAFRO hosts networking events, invites speakers, participates in conferences, drafts articles and papers, and submits comments on proposed rules published in the Federal Register.

    To learn more about CAFRO, please email us at CAFRO.Mlaw-requests@umich.edu and cafro-board@umich.edu.

  • Criminal Law Society

    The Criminal Law Society (CLS) is dedicated to providing a forum for its members and the Law School at large to explore current discourse, issues, and interests in different areas of criminal law, including careers and opportunities. The Society has been a large and very active part of the Law School for several years, and today has over 75 members. Each year, the Criminal Law Society arranges special speaker events and symposiums on topics including exoneration of the wrongfully convicted, restorative justice, and the criminalization of homelessness. The Criminal Law Society is led by a five-member general executive board, and is assisted by 1L representatives chosen from among the Society. All members of the Law School community are welcome and invited to join.

    To learn more about the Criminal Law Society, please email us at crimlawsocietyboard@umich.edu

  • Disability Rights Organization

    Disability Rights Organization, founded in Fall 2018, is a supportive community that advocates for the disability rights of students in the law school. Our objective is to facilitate the accommodations process for law school students in and outside of the classroom and minimize the stigma surrounding disability through informational programming. We hope to educate members on disability in the workplace and disability as an asset. We welcome and encourage the membership of all students who are interested in learning more about the challenges that students and legal professionals with disabilities face.

    To learn more about the Disability Rights Organization, please contact us via email at dro-board@umich.edu

  • Education Law and Policy Society

    The Education Law and Policy Society (ELPS) is a student-led organization designed to create awareness by providing Michigan law students with a forum to discuss all issues relating to education including the achievement gap, the cycle of poverty, racial/ethnic/gender equality, higher education, rural and urban education, and relevant reform measures.

    To learn more about the Education Law and Policy Society, please contact us via email at elps-exec@umich.edu

  • Entertainment, Media, and Arts Law Students Association

    The mission of the Entertainment, Media, and Arts Law Students Association (EMALSA) is to provide a forum for students to explore opportunities in entertainment law, to cultivate important connections with practitioners and industry leaders, and to investigate developments in the law and music, theatre, motion picture, television, cable, radio, media, publishing, and visual arts industries. EMALSA facilitates a variety of professional, academic, and recreational activities, including:

    • Guest speaker forums featuring practitioners, industry representatives, academics, public policy experts, and legislators;
    • Alumni outreach programs, mentoring opportunities, and networking events;
    • Course selection, seminar, and entertainment program assistance to help members build strong foundations in entertainment law;
    • Volunteering opportunities with arts and entertainment law organizations;
    • Movie nights and social outings; and
    • Scholarship, competition, and publication advising.

    Members have published articles in entertainment law journals and successfully competed in prestigious national competitions such as the BMI/Cardozo Entertainment Moot Court Competition and the Grammy Foundation's Entertainment Law Initiative national writing competition.

    EMALSA membership is open to the entire Law School community. EMALSA welcomes students to explore this unique field, harnessing a range of academic disciplines, including intellectual property, contracts, business, labor and employment, securities, tax, arbitration, litigation, and negotiation.

    To learn more about EMALSA, please contact us via email at umlsemalsaboard@umich.edu

  • Entrepreneurship & Law Association

    The Entrepreneurship & Law Association is a law student-run organization seeking to promote the entrepreneurial community throughout the University of Michigan. We value risk-taking, innovative thinking, and collaboration in support of the drive to create. By bringing entrepreneurial minded people together, we hope to inspire and foster relationships among entrepreneurs, their counsel, and other members of the entrepreneurial ecosystem.

    To learn more about the Entrepreneurship & Law Association, please contact us via email at ela.board@umich.edu.

  • Environmental Law Society

    The Environmental Law Society (ELS) is dedicated to providing students with an opportunity to learn about and actively participate in the protection of our environment. As a Law School organization ELS emphasizes legal issues, but also works to foster a community in which students with an interest in the environment can meet and interact with one another.

    ELS organizes a number of social events throughout the year including the annual ELS ski trip, bar nights, and nature hikes in the forests and parks around Ann Arbor.

    ELS was the driving force in starting the paper recycling program within the Law School, and was responsible for extending the recycling services available to undergraduates living in campus housing to law students living in the Law Quadrangle. ELS also helps to maintain the Law School's composting program. In the past, ELS has also taken part in the Michigan Department of Transportation's Adopt-A-Highway program, as well as Huron River Watershed preservation activities.

    To learn more about the Environmental Law Society, please contact us via email at umlselsboard@umich.edu.

  • Federalist Society

    The Federalist Society at the University of Michigan Law School is a non-profit membership organization dedicated to bringing conservative and libertarian ideas into legal education. We sponsor debates, speeches and symposia to advance our principles that the state exists to preserve freedom, that the separation of governmental powers is central to our Constitution and that it is emphatically the province and duty of the judiciary to say what the law is, not what it should be.

    The Society is firmly committed to presenting a variety of perspectives to broaden the exposure of Michigan students and the community. By emphasizing libertarian and conservative legal scholarship, the Society provides opportunities for members to debate and discuss these ideas among themselves, and adds necessary and desirable diversity of thought to the Law School and the University community.

    You may reach the Federalist Society via email at fedsocexecs@umich.edu. To learn more about Michigan Law's chapter of the Federalist Society and stay up to date on current events, please visit our Facebook page or follow us on Twitter.​ 

  • First Generation Law Students

    First Generation Law Students ("FGLS") aims to provide University of Michigan Law School students with a community of like-minded individuals facing similar difficulties. FGLS also encourages students to learn about the different backgrounds students come to law school with and how to navigate law school without a 'step up.' FGLS also aims to bring together and foster community among students, peers, professors, and practitioners interested in networking and collaboration within the law school relating to first generation and diversity issues.

    To learn more about the First Generation Law Students, please contact us via email at fgls-board@umich.edu

  • First They Scare You to Death: Law School Horror Club

    First They Scare You to Death: Law School Horror Club provides a space to appreciate and critically reflect upon the horror genre. Prominent works in cinema, literature, and other mediums are examined. It was founded in the fall of 2019. 

    To learn more about the First They Scare You to Death: Law School Horror Club, please contact us via email at thedarklords@umich.edu

  • Frank Murphy Society

    The Frank Murphy Society (FMS) seeks to provide both a social outlet and career focused resource for law students interested in pursuing government work through a policy position or elected office after graduation. FMS strives to connect those students with one another through a social community while simultaneously providing career-related events with alumni and figures working in areas of interest to our membership.

    Michigan Law is a wonderful place for government-minded students, as we have a wealth of resources and well-placed alums. FMS has held events with congressmen, candidates for office, and such top-level officials as Senior Obama Advisor and '81 MLaw grad Valerie Jarrett. FMS even traveled to the White House during the summer of 2010 at the invitation of Ms. Jarrett.

    Whether holding meetings at Dominick's or walking the halls of Congress, FMS has been there and will continue to be there for those students interested in government and politics. 

    To learn more about the Frank Murphy Society, please contact us via email at fms-eboard@umich.edu and murphysocietyexec@umich.edu.  

  • Gender Violence Project

    The Gender Violence Project (“GVP”) is a student organization at the University of Michigan Law School. We believe that every person has the right to feel safe and free from fear of violence in their homes, communities, and workplaces. We strive to transform society's response to gender-based violence and sexual exploitation through a feminist legal lens, grounded in intersectionality. GVP is run by a non-hierarchical board and relies on the work of law students organized into committees. 

    To learn more about GVP, please contact us via email at gvpeboard@umich.edu. For more information on GVP, visit our website

  • Headnotes

    The Headnotes are the University of Michigan Law School's a cappella singing group. Composed of approximately 18 law students, the Headnotes perform popular arrangements in four-part harmony. The Headnotes are the only singing group in the Law School and tailor their rehearsal schedule to meet the busy schedules of law students.

    The Headnotes perform at graduation, Valentine's Day, and at their annual holiday and spring concerts. Auditions are held early in the fall and all interested persons are encouraged to attend.

    To learn more about the Headnotes, please contact us via email at umlsheadnotesboard@umich.edu

  • Henry M. Campbell Moot Court Competition

    The Henry M. Campbell Moot Court Competition has been an annual event at the Law School for more than eighty years. Winning it is one of the highest honors a Michigan law student can achieve.

    The Campbell Competition, open to all interested second- and third-year students, visiting and dual degree students, is a test of the contestants' skills in the art of appellate advocacy, both oral and written. Each year the students who serve on the Campbell Board construct a hypothetical case which involves a topic of current social concern and raises difficult unresolved legal questions. The record of this case is distributed to potential competitors early in the fall semester.

    Participants submit written briefs on the issues of the case and then take part in oral arguments in the preliminary round late in the fall term. Students work in pairs to complete their briefs, but participate individually in oral arguments. Evaluation is based upon both oral and written performance. The quarterfinal round is held early in the winter term, and a semi-final round is held after Spring Break. The top two competitors advance to the final round held in early April. The panel of judges for the final argument includes members of the Federal Bench. All competitors learn a tremendous amount of substantive law while developing their written and oral advocacy skills. 

    To learn more about the Henry M. Campbell Moot Court Competition, please contact us via email at campbellboard@umich.edu

  • Intellectual Property Students Association

    The Intellectual Property Students Association (IPSA) was founded in the fall of 1988 in response to a growing student interest in intellectual property related practices. These practices, encompassed by IPSA activities, include: patent and trademark law (litigation and prosecution), copyright, trade secrets, and unfair competition. Total membership regularly exceeds 100 students from diverse educational and career backgrounds spanning the general arts and sciences, as well as the engineering, business and entertainment fields.

    The main goals of the organization are to create a sense of community among students already interested in intellectual property, and to provide exposure to the IP areas of law for those students who may be unaware of its possibilities. These goals are accomplished by providing students with a forum and access to information through which they may investigate and discuss career options, the means to keep abreast of developments in law and related technologies, the opportunity to develop important connections with practitioners, and the chance to participate in projects offering practical experience and training.

    Projects include sponsoring speakers to discuss topics of interest within the related fields; panel discussions on career-related and academic topics; networking events with other campus units, with law students, and with practitioners; mentoring; and participation in intellectual property moot courts. In addition, members have the opportunity to interact socially at various events sponsored by IPSA.

    To learn more about the Intellectual Property Students Association, please contact us via email at ipsaexec@umich.edu and visit us on Facebook

  • International Law Society

    The International Law Society (ILS) is devoted to promoting a greater understanding of international and comparative law and the role they play in the world today. ILS sponsors a variety of events throughout the year aimed at bringing students, faculty, and other interested people together to learn more about this exciting and important area of law. Speakers include faculty members from universities around the world, government experts, visiting scholars, and students with particular areas of expertise. Settings include lectures, panel discussions, informal lunchtime meetings, and evening talks.

    In addition to hosting events covering substantive contemporary international issues, ILS also organizes various career panels and other social activities between JD candidates, LLM students, and faculty members.

    To learn more about the International Law Society, please contact us via email at ils.board@umich.edu

  • International Refugee Assistance Project

    IRAP provides comprehensive legal representation to refugees seeking resettlement. Law students work in groups of three under the supervision of attorneys and prepare visa applications and appeals, as well as help clients negotiate resettlement and navigate the resettlement process. In addition to managing casework, students are expected to attend monthly case rounds and training seminars to gain insight from other students and practitioners. IRAP also has a policy team that works to advocate for refugees and participates in client intake for IRAP National. 

    To learn more about IRAP, please contact us via email at irap-board@umich.edu

  • J. Reuben Clark Law Society

    The purpose and mission of student chapters of the J. Reuben Clark Law Society is the same as that of the general chapters of the Law Society. As students learn the law and ethics of law in law school, the student chapter can help them recognize the strength that can be brought to the law by the students' personal religious convictions. Student chapters can, through public service and excellence, promote fairness and virtue both in the study of the law and in the law community around them. 

    As these values are instilled from the beginning of the study of law, they will be more integrated into the attorneys' practices. The student can network from the beginning with attorneys and other law students who have the same ethical values and philosophies. Upon graduation, they can continue this association as a member of the local chapter of the Law Society where they practice law.

    To learn more about the J. Reuben Clark Law Society, please contact us via email at jrcls-board@umich.edu

  • JDs in the D

    JDs in the D aims to showcase the outstanding work that the Michigan Law community has been doing in Detroit, and to further bring the Michigan Law community as a partner with Detroit-based organizations in the overall effort to revitalize Detroit. We also work to protect the basic rights of individuals living in the area, and to redevelop the Detroit area as a prosperous, sustainable urban center that provides economic, educational, social, and creative opportunities for individuals and the community as a whole.

    To learn more about JDs in the D, please contact us via email at jdsinthed-board@umich.edu

  • Jewish Law Students Association

    The Jewish Law Students Association (JLSA), a student organization at the University of Michigan Law School, is dedicated to providing a wide variety of religious, social, and cultural programming for the entire student body of the Law School. The group presents speakers, panel discussions, and films dealing with issues of interest to Jewish law students, as well as professional networking opportunities. We also sponsor social events within the law school and with other Jewish student organizations at the University. Members also have the opportunity to participate in regional and national Jewish law student conferences and events.

    The best way to keep up to date with current Jewish events at the Law School is to join our e-mail list. Please email jlsaexecboard@umich.edu to join or to find out more about JLSA! 

  • Latinx Law Students Association

    The Latinx Law Students Association (LLSA) seeks to remedy the under-representation of Latinos in all segments of the legal community. Throughout the year, we are involved in law school recruitment, academic mentoring, hosting guest lectures on topics of concern to the Latinx community, moderating panel discussions, and forging a network among students, faculty, and alumni across the legal profession.


    You may reach the Latinx Law Students Association via email at llsa-eboard@umich.edu. To learn more about the Latinx Law Students Association, please visit our website.

  • Law and Economics Society

    The Law and Economics Society (LES) at the University of Michigan Law School exists to facilitate engagement with law and economics at the University of Michigan Law School by allowing and encouraging student inquiry, discussion, and debate about canonical and novel topics in the law and economics school of thought. LES seeks to host speaker events, reading and discussion groups, and generally promote law and economics as a mode of legal analysis and thought at the Law School.

    For any questions or inquiries, please contact us via email at laweconboard@umich.edu.

  • Law School Book Club

    We seek to bring together members of the Law School that share a love of reading by hosting monthly book club meetings. We hope to promote a more thorough understanding of the works of important literary figures while giving students an opportunity to step away from their law books and escape into fiction. 

    You may reach the Law School Book Club via email at lawschoolbookclubboard@umich.edu. For more information, please visit our website.

  • Law School Hockey Team

    The Law School Hockey Team (also known as "The Ambulance Chasers") is a co-ed ice hockey team that plays throughout the year in the Ann Arbor Adult Hockey League. In the Winter Semester, we play in the Michigan Justice Cup against other law schools. Additionally, we play against the Ross Business School in the Monroe Street Cup. The Law School Hockey Team is a great way to keep active and get some stress relief from the demands of law school. 

    To learn more about the Law School Hockey Team, please contact us via email at michiganlawhockey@umich.edu

  • Law School Student Senate

    The Law School Student Senate (LSSS) is the Law School's elected student government. LSSS serves a wide range of functions and constantly strives to meet the various needs and interests of students at Michigan Law.

    LSSS is the main funding source for all Law School student organizations, and it also facilitates student involvement with the Law School Administration. LSSS sponsors numerous Law School events throughout the year, including events such as the Halloween Party, Faculty-Student Wine and Cheese Events, Faculty Member Lectures, Winter Formal, Bar Nights, and Welcome and End-of-the-Year Events. LSSS also manages two different Law School listserv systems for students and faculty to use.

    LSSS facilitates change on behalf of students. The organization appoints students to all University and Law School standing committees, assists with faculty hiring, liaises with administrative officials on behalf of students, provides several services for law students, and leads various initiatives to help improve student life and academics at Michigan Law. LSSS also influences policy at the Lawyers Club through its representatives on the Lawyers Club governing body, the Board of Governors.

    To learn more about the Law School Student Senate, please contact us via email at lssseboard@umich.edu

  • Legal Advocates for Children and Youth

    Legal Advocates for Children and Youth (LACY) strives to make advocacy for children and youth at Michigan Law a priority by: establishing an organized forum for students to learn about domestic and international children’s rights; discussing innovative ways that we as law students and future attorneys can empower children and youth; and fostering connections between students and the greater children and youth law community—including alumni working in the field, faculty conducting relevant research, other University of Michigan departments and research centers, and the local community. 

    To learn more about the Legal Advocates for Children and Youth, please contact us via email at lacy-board@umich.edu.

  • Legal Alternative Winter Breaks

    Legal Alternative Winter Breaks (LAWBreaks) offers service-learning experiences for Michigan Law students during the traditional Spring Break of the academic calendar. The trips are designed to provide a brief immersion into the human side of a pressing legal or social justice issue. Students meet and work together with actors on many side of the relevant issues, contribute to important social justice work, and have a chance to bond with fellow students outside of Hutchins Hall.

    You may reach LAWBreaks via email at lawbreaks@umich.edu. To learn more about LAWBreaks, please visit our website

  • Lex Vitae: Protect Life at Michigan Law

    Lex Vitae - Protect Life at Michigan Law exists to promote a viewpoint that embraces the value of human life from conception to natural death. We seek to foster discussion that influences the hearts and minds of students on issues including, but not limited to, abortion, euthanasia, capital punishment, assisted reproductive technologies, eugenics, assisted suicide, and population planning.

    To learn more about Lex Vitae - Protect Life at Michigan Law, please contact us via email at lexvitaeexec@umich.edu

  • MDefenders

    MDefenders is a faculty-sponsored organization at the University of Michigan Law School designed to (a) help current law students figure out if public defense is the right career path for them; (b) provide a nurturing and supportive community for aspiring public defenders; (c) teach aspiring public defenders skills to help them succeed as public defenders; (d) connect University of Michigan alumni who are doing public defense work with one another and provide them with helpful resources; and (e) help connect students and alumni interested in public defense jobs with employers who are looking to hire public defenders.

    University of Michigan Law School students interested in attending MDefenders events should look at the Calendar of Events and examine the many resources available under the Students tab. They can also look at our intensive, year-long, four-credit Public Defender Training Institute.

    University of Michigan Alumni doing public defender work can access resources on the Alumni tab.

    Employers interested in listing job postings should go to the Employers tab.

    If you have questions about MDefenders, please contact Professor Eve Brensike Primus at ebrensik@umich.edu.

    To learn more about about MDefenders please contact us via email at mdefendersboard@umich.edu.

  • M for the People

    The organization will serve as a training and social group for students hoping to become criminal prosecutors and civil litigators for the government. This group will also focus on educating its membership about the overarching issues and concepts that prosecutors and civil litigators will have to grapple with throughout their careers, such as mass incarceration, prosecutorial discretion, historically discriminatory practices, the adversarial system, and so forth. 

    To learn more about M for the People, please contact us via email at mforthepeopleexec@umich.edu

  • Michigan European Law Organization

    Michigan European Law Organization (MELO) brings together students and scholars interested in all aspects of European law, promotes diverse and critical academic reflection on European national and regional legal systems, and fosters creation of professional networks and opportunities in areas related to European law. 

    To learn more about the Michigan European Law Organization, please contact us via email at european.law.org.board@umich.edu

  • Michigan Health Law Organization

    The Michigan Health Law Organization (MHLO) was founded in 2004 to educate law students about the legal, medical, and ethical issues pertaining to health law and policy; to generate student interest in health law; to facilitate dialogue regarding health law and related issues; and to bring law students into contact with professionals practicing in the field of health law.

    To learn more about the Michigan Health Law Organization, please contact us via email at mhlo-exec@umich.edu

  • Michigan Immigration and Labor Law Association

    The Michigan Immigration and Labor Law Association (MILLA) engages in advocacy and organizing on labor and immigration issues both here in Michigan and around the world. We collaborate with local stakeholders and legal advocates, organize pro bono and community service opportunities at the law school, and provide career support and mentoring for students interested in practicing immigration or labor law. We also host lunch talks and a small dinner talk each semester ("salons") with a professor or practitioner to discuss topical immigration and labor law issues. 

    To learn more about the MILLA, please contact us via email at millaboard@umich.edu.

  • Michigan International Law Moot Court Association

    Michigan International Law Moot Court Association is a group of law students who participate in various international law moot court competitions, including the annual Jessup International Law Moot Court Competition. As competitors, the team members research international legal problems, draft briefs, and participate in oral arguments. Tryouts for various international law competitions are held annually. 

    You may reach the Michigan International Law Moot Court Association via email at ilmootsboard@umich.edu and ilawmootsboard@umich.edu. For more information, please visit our website

  • Michigan Law and Political Economy

    Michigan Law and Political Economy at the University of Michigan Law School is dedicated to engaging with and advancing the study of Law and Political Economy, a legal movement that aims to transform legal scholarship and pedagogy by centering issues of economic power, racial and gender subordination, and meaningful democratic inclusion. To that end, this student group creates opportunities for the law school community to think collectively about how to develop new policy solutions, intellectual approaches, and political strategies adequate to the crises of our time.

    For more information contact us at michiganlpe-exec@umich.edu

  • Michigan Law Veterans Society

    Michigan Law Veterans Society (MILVETS) is established for the purpose of addressing issues of importance regarding military service, veterans’ issues and the laws of war. MILVETS will strive to ensure that the Admissions Department of the University of Michigan Law School has a resource to help veterans feel comfortable and supported in their transition from military service into the law school.

    You may reach the Michigan Law Veterans Society via email at milvetsboard@umich.edu.

  • Michigan Parity Project

    The Michigan Parity Project consists of law students organizing nationwide to end how the legal profession—and the law itself—enables harassment, discrimination, and other injustices.

    To learn more about the Michigan Parity Project, please contact us via email at mppsteering@umich.edu.

  • Michigan Texas Club

    The Michigan Texas Club provides professional and social opportunities for MLaw students interested in the Texas market. Students can begin building their in-Texas network with fellow students, alums, firms, and public interest opportunities in the Great State of Texas. The group hosts social events for its members, panel and speaker discussions specific to Texas legal issues and practices, and networking events with employers. Through these events, members will learn about distinct opportunities available in Texas, like the different practice groups available at firms and the unique social justice causes focused on by Texas public interest attorneys. Most importantly, members will learn about the benefits of working and living in Texas, like its unbeatable culture and substantially lower cost of living. 

    To learn more about the Michigan Texas Club, please contact us via email at michigan.texas.club.eboard@umich.edu

  • Michigan Voting Project

    The Michigan Voting Project (MVP) provides nonpartisan opportunities for Michigan Law students to explore the fields of election, campaign finance, and voting rights law in order to help the democratic process achieve its full potential. MVP fosters student interest in these areas through a range of activities, including research, voter registration, election monitoring, service opportunities, and connection with practitioners and academics.

    To learn more about the Michigan Voting Project, please contact us via email at mvpeboard@umich.edu

  • Middle Eastern and North African Law Students Association

    The Middle Eastern and North African Law Students Association seeks to foster an inclusive environment and community network for Michigan law students of Middle Eastern and North African descent, including Arab, North African, Iranian, Turkish, and Armenian students. The Middle Eastern and North African Law Students Association hopes to provide a space at Michigan Law where students of Middle Eastern descent can feel comfortable speaking on a range of social, legal and political issues central to their identities. The Middle Eastern and North African Law Students Association will also work in tandem with other affinity groups, to give Middle Eastern and North African students and other minorities a stronger voice on campus. The Middle Eastern and North African Law Students Association will host a range of events, including engaging the campus community through panel discussions and events that touch on matters pertaining to the Middle East and North Africa, its people and the diaspora. The Middle Eastern and North African Law Students Association will also provide opportunities to connect Middle Eastern and North African students with resources to support them in law school and with career goals.

    To learn more about the Middle Eastern and North African Law Students Association, please contact us via email at menalsaboard@umich.edu.  

  • MLaw Rocks

    MLaw Rocks promotes rock climbing as a life enhancing activity providing a healthy respite from the intensity of the study of law, while developing a complementary problem solving skill set and mental discipline reinforced by a sense of personal achievement.

    We host regular trips to the local climbing gym, sporadic weekend trips to the Red River Gorge, and fall and spring break trips to other climbing locations, as well as the potential for informal summer trip. MLaw Rocks is also a platform for coordination and partnership with other climbing groups and individual rock climbers across the country and internationally.

    To learn more about MLaw Rocks, please contact us via email at mlawrocksboard@umich.edu

  • Muslim Law Students Association

    The Muslim Law Students Association is dedicated to raising awareness regarding legal matters related to American Muslims and Muslims around the world. We hope to foster a sense of community within the law school and to support our membership so they can succeed in their legal careers. 

    To learn more about the Muslim Law Students Association, please contact us via email at mlsa-board@umich.edu

  • National Lawyers Guild

    We exist to provide a home for progressive and radical students at Michigan Law. The National Lawyers Guild is the nation’s oldest and largest progressive bar association and was the first one in the U.S. to be racially integrated. We are a student chapter affiliated with the Detroit/Michigan NLG chapter and with student chapters at other law schools in Michigan. Our mission is to use law for the people—uniting lawyers, law students, legal workers, and jailhouse lawyers to function as an effective force in the service of the people, and valuing human and ecological rights and interests over private property. 

    NLG is dedicated to meeting the need for basic change in the structure of our political, legal, and economic system. Our aim is to bring together all those who recognize the importance of building power among workers, women, LGBTQ people, immigrants, people with disabilities, people of color, and other oppressed peoples and nations across the world; those who seek actively to eliminate racism; those who work to maintain and protect our civil rights and liberties in the face of persistent attacks upon them; and those who use the law as an instrument for the protection and liberation of the people, rather than for their repression. 

    To learn more about the National Lawyers Guild, please contact us via email at umlsnlgboard@umich.edu

  • National Security Law Society

    The National Security Law Society (NSLS) aims to foster interest in and understanding of the legal aspects and ramifications of national and international security via speakers and other programs. We also work to aid members in pursuit of careers in national security law and to contribute to the development of this field of legal study. 

    To learn more about the National Security Law Society, please contact us via email at natsecboard@umich.edu

  • Native American Law Students Association

    The Native American Law Students Association (NALSA) is a dynamic group of both Native and non-Native individuals. What do we have in common? We are all interested in issues currently affecting the Native American community. We aim to promote understanding and cooperation between Native Americans and other students concerning legal issues of great significance to all.

    NALSA's purposes are threefold:

    • To increase awareness of federal Indian and tribal law.
    • To provide support for Native and non-Native students interested in Native American issues.
    • To foster community service towards Natives and non-Natives which promotes greater understanding between the two groups.

    NALSA is organized for social and educational purposes, promoting unity and cooperation among Native American law students and providing a basis for working for the advancement of Native American people. To increase communication among Native American law students, Native American lawyers, and the general public, NALSA provides a forum at the University of Michigan for the discussion and exploration of legal problems affecting Native Americans. NALSA serves as an information source for Native American law students on educational financial assistance, educational opportunities, and employment opportunities.

    For more information about NALSA, please contact us via email at nalsaexec@umich.edu

  • Older Wiser Law Students

    Older Wiser Law Students (OWLS) is dedicated to fostering a supportive community for non-traditional law students while articulating, promoting, and advocating for our needs and goals at the University of Michigan Law School. While we don't take ourselves too seriously, we also recognize that law school poses different challenges and experiences for those who are transitioning from other careers, balancing spouses and/or children, or simply took some time off before law school. We realize that some types of get-to-know-your-classmates events may have lost their luster for those who have been over 21 for awhile, yet we still crave the interaction and networking that a collegial law school provides. The organization is open to all students who share its mission.

    To learn more about OWLS, please contact us via email at owlsboard@umich.edu

  • On the Board (Michigan Law's Tabletop Gaming Club)

    On the Board helps Michigan Law students to connect and de-stress alongside their peers from different sections and classes by providing a regular forum for tabletop gaming.

    To learn more about On the Board, please contact us via email at OnTheBoardExecs@umich.edu

  • Organization of Public Interest Students

    The Organization of Public Interest Students (OPIS) strives to provide a community for law students interested in public interest work and to advocate for better programming, funding, and faculty for public interest at the Law School. OPIS connects public interest students with each other through a mentorship program in which students share class, internship, and career advice, as well as through regular social activities.

    OPIS seeks to provide a supportive environment for public interest minded students, and works with the Law School administration, particularly the Office of Public Service, to provide resources for students to make their public interest goals a reality.

    You may reach OPIS via email at umlsopisboard@umich.edu. To learn more about the Organization of Public Interest Students, please visit our website

  • Outlaws

    Outlaws is a political and social organization that serves the needs of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender community at the University of Michigan Law School. Outlaws advocates for the inclusion of LGBTQ perspectives within the Law School, and works with allies within the School and beyond to end discrimination in all its forms. We sponsor numerous educational and social events throughout the year, keep the Law School community informed on legal issues affecting LGBTQ rights, and raise the visibility of LGBTQ people within the legal profession. Outlaws pursues its educational efforts in solidarity with other student organizations.

    Outlaws also provides a dynamic social space for members of the LGBTQ community at the Law School.

    You may reach the Outlaws via email at outlawsexec@umich.edu. To learn more about Outlaws, please visit our ​website. The organization is open to all students who share its mission.

  • Privacy & Technology Law Association

    The Privacy & Technology Law Association (PTLA) focuses on technology policy issues, including security and surveillance, privacy rights in the digital sphere, and Internet openness.

    In addition to hosting events to foster a vibrant intellectual dialogue on how technology affects the legal framework in which we live, we organize various career panels and other social activities for JD candidates, LLM students, faculty members, and individuals from throughout the University of Michigan community.

    To learn more about the Privacy & Technology Law Association, please contact us via email at ptlaboard@umich.edu

  • Property Tax Appeal Project (PTAP)

    The Property Tax Appeal Project (PTAP) organizes and trains student-advocates to help primarily low-income Detroit homeowners appeal their over-assessed property taxes, and reduce the number of illegal foreclosures. The mission of PTAP is twofold: (1) to inspire and educate students on issues related to property tax justice, and (2) to provide a valuable service for low-income communities by helping lower their property taxes within the legal limits of the Michigan Constitution. Student advocates assist with intake, draft appeal letters and help collect evidence of home damage and neighborhood conditions to be presented each year at the city's March Board of Review. During the 2019-2020 academic year, PTAP was selected to receive the "Outstanding Pro Bono Project" award.

    To learn more about the Property Tax Appeal Project, please contact us via email at PTAPcoordinators@umich.edu

  • Public Benefits Advocacy Project

    Members of the Public Benefits Advocacy Project (PBAP) visit local transitional housing and community centers to assist clients in completing applications for food stamps and other public benefits. Under the supervision of three attorneys, we hold weekly office hours at Legal Services of South Central Michigan to help clients navigate the public benefits system, serving as advocates to ensure they receive the benefits to which they are entitled.

    Members typically attend one two-hour screening per month and/or a few two-hour office hours sessions per semester. We provide substantive and skill training for new members during the fall of each year in cooperation with attorneys from the Michigan Poverty Law Program. We also provide refresher training for returning members at the beginning of the school year.

    PBAP provides law students with a valuable opportunity to participate in community service, learn about public interest and administrative law, and develop skills such as compassionate client interviewing and effective communication with government agencies.

    For more information about PBAP, please contact us via email at pbapboard@umich.edu

  • Racial Justice Coalition

    The Racial Justice Coalition originated in the midst of demonstrations across the country following the shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri. RJC hopes to create a space within the law school and the community to agitate for social change as well as maintain a dialogue that advances the equitable treatment of all people who encounter the justice system in Michigan. We envision a future in which the law is no longer used to oppress people of color in our communities. 

    You may reach the Racial Justice Coalition via email at​ rjc-board@umich.edu. For more information, please visit our website.

  • ​Reproductive Rights and Justice at Michigan Law

    The goal of Reproductive Rights and Justice (“RRJ”) at Michigan Law is to protect and expand reproductive rights as basic civil and human rights. We do so through community education, organization and mobilization. The organization focuses on providing and maintaining a community of individuals with similar goals regarding reproductive justice at the University of Michigan Law School. We strive to do this through events related to reproductive justice that educate and involve the community. 

    To learn more about RRJ, please contact us via email at rrjeboard@umich.edu

  • Res Sista Loquitur: Women of Color Coalition

    Res Sista Loquitur: Women of Color Coalition is a student organization founded in October 2017 dedicated to creating a strong and supportive community for women of color at the University of Michigan Law School. Our objective is to address issues that affect women of color in the workplace and society at large by providing our members with tailored support, safe spaces, and mentorship opportunities. We hope to better prepare our fellow women of color to navigate the unique challenges that the legal profession presents through panel discussions, workshops, and other events that focus on what women of color should be considering when thinking about professional development and career aspirations in both corporate law and public interest.

    Although Res Sista is a space created for women of color, we welcome and encourage the membership of all people who are interested in learning more about the challenges women of color face in society, within the law school, and the legal profession.

    You may reach the Res Sista Loquitur: Women of Color Coalition via email at​ ressista-exec@umich.edu. To learn more about Res Sista Loquitur, please visit our website.

  • Society for Space Law and the Law of the Sea

    The Society for Space Law and the Law of the Sea (SSLS) strives to provide opportunities for personal and professional enrichment to the University of Michigan Law School's student body and its members by deepening the understanding of the legal and policy framework governing use of space and the sea. The organization focuses on exploring professional opportunities for those who hold career interests in space law or law of the sea, as well as on drawing speakers to campus who can discuss various aspects of both areas of law. 

    To learn more about the Society for Space Law and the Law of the Sea, please contact us via email at sslls-leaders@umich.edu

  • South Asian Law Students Association

    The South Asian Law Students Association (SALSA) is the Michigan Law chapter of the North American South Asian Law Students Association (NASALSA). SALSA serves as an interactive community for those in the Law School who identify with, or trace their lineage to, one of the countries that comprise South Asia (Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Nepal, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka). SALSA also welcomes and encourages any and all law students who have an interest in South Asian culture, or legal issues involving South Asia, to join.

    SALSA seeks to foster a cohesive South Asian community at Michigan Law whose members will go on to become active members in the South Asian community at large. We aim to encourage the South Asian community at the Law School, as well as the larger law student body and other organizations around campus, to engage in legal and social issues important to South Asia and the South Asian diaspora.

    To learn more about the South Asian Law Students Association, please contact us via email at salsaeboard@umich.edu

  • Sports Law Society

    The Sports Law Society (SLS) aims to further explore the legal issues and career opportunities available in the area of sports law. The organization is devoted to providing students the necessary resources, guidance, and contacts to support the pursuit of professional endeavors in sports practices.

    SLS hosts speakers and symposia on hot topics in the field, organizes field trips and social events, and provides students with academic and professional guidance in the field. The society also partners with related organizations to advance shared interests among students. By providing access to leaders and practitioners in the sports law arena, SLS gives interested students the opportunity to explore and pursue this exciting area of legal practice. 

    To learn more about the Sports Law Society, please contact us via email at sportslawboard@umich.edu

  • Student Animal Legal Defense Fund (SALDF)

    The Student Animal Legal Defense Fund (SALDF) is one of many law school chapters affiliated with the Animal Legal Defense Fund. It shares the Animal Legal Defense Fund's mission to protect the lives and advance the interests of animals through the legal system. SALDF has many resources, activities, speakers, and networking opportunities for students interested in the field of animal law.

    To learn more about the Student Animal Legal Defense Fund, please contact us via email at saldf-board@umich.edu

  • Student Funded Fellowships

    Student Funded Fellowships (SFF) is a proud Michigan Law tradition dating back to 1977. This student-run program provides guaranteed summer funding to all first-year law students by:

    1. Awarding competitive grants in the amount of $6,000 to 1Ls focused on careers in public service. In 2018, SFF provided 24 of these grants.
    2. Providing interest-free loans in the amount of $4000 to all 1Ls (except those who receive an SFF grant or other Michigan Law funding for the summer).

    For more information about applying for SFF funding, please email sff.chairs@umich.edu.  

    SFF Loan Request Form

    Make a gift in support of SFF

  • Students for Reforming Legal Education

    Students for Reforming Legal Education is a student organization that is devoted to giving students a voice and examining the systemic issues in the legal education system. These include, but are not limited to, the LSAT, grades, law school finals, pedagogy, classroom structure, the bar, and various forms of privilege and elitism. We are committed to work with other Michigan students, other organizations, faculty, administration, and other law schools to think about how to address these systemic problems. If you are interested, then come check out SRLE and learn more about how to get involved! Our goal is to create research products, bring in experts to discuss legal education, coordinate with other schools, and examine how Michigan approaches these issues and whatever other topics you want. We're recruiting new members and eager to get started on advocating on the issues we all care so much about.

    To learn more about about Students for Reforming Legal Education please contact us via email at srleexecboard@umich.edu .

  • Student Rights Project​

    The Student Rights Project (SRP) is a pro bono project comprised of graduate students in the University of Michigan’s schools of law, social work, and education. In partnership with the Student Advocacy Center (SAC), we advocate for K-12 students facing suspension or expulsion in Southeast Michigan. Our advocacy model is holistic to empower youth and families throughout the school disciplinary process, to connect students with community support networks, and to limit the use and negative consequences of exclusionary discipline. SRP also organizes and promotes activities designed to challenge institutional threats to educational opportunities for all Michigan children, including reviewing school codes of conduct through the School Code Project.

    To learn more about the Student Rights Project, please contact us via email at srp-board@umich.edu.  

  • TJ Hooper & the Learned Hands

    TJ Hooper & the Learned Hands is a musical ensemble made up of students of the Law School. The group's mission is to provide entertainment to the Law School student body and musical opportunities for its members. The group has traditionally been a rock/pop ensemble that performs cover versions of popular songs at school events such as the Halloween Party and Law Prom.

    To learn more about TJ Hooper & the Learned Hands, please contact us via email at tjhooperband@umich.edu.  ​

  • Trial Advocacy Society

    The Trial Advocacy Society (TAS) is an organization focused on encouraging Michigan Law students to learn trial advocacy skills and to better equip them to pursue careers as trial lawyers. TAS offers law students opportunities to meet practicing trial attorneys, attend speaker events focused on trial theory and evidence, and participate in student-taught workshops on trial skills. To give students an opportunity to use their skills in practice, TAS coordinates try outs, practices, and travel logistics for the MLaw Mock Trial Team -- a select group of students who compete against other law school mock trial teams at regional and national tournaments. By providing opportunities to learn, practice, and compete, TAS aims to help law students gain the skills and knowledge necessary to be effective trial-level litigators.

    For more information, please visit our website. Please contact our board via email at trialadvocacyboard@umich.edu to learn more about upcoming events and MLaw Mock Trial team tryouts. 

  • Veggies of MLaw

    Veggies of MLaw works to grow and support the vegetarian and vegan community at the University of Michigan Law School. Our goals are to promote a better understanding of veganism, vegetarianism, and animal rights, facilitate accommodations for more inclusive dietary options at Michigan, and foster a community of likeminded individuals. We host regular inclusive, community meals, sponsor speakers on the law of animal rights, and conduct philanthropic events related to animal welfare.

    To learn more about Veggies of MLaw, please contact us via email at veggiesofmlawboard@umich.edu.  

  • Wolverine Street Law

    Wolverine Street Law ("Street Law") allows students an opportunity to utilize their legal education by teaching community members about legal rights and remedies as they relate to a variety of subjects, particularly those whose access to legal advice and education is limited. Students work with adults and children at four different sites within Ann Arbor and the nearby community: Bryant Elementary School, Parnall Correctional Facility, the Washtenaw County Juvenile Detention Center, and Women’s Huron Valley Correctional Facility. Street Law provides training at the beginning of each semester.

    To learn more about Wolverine Street Law, please contact us via email at wolverinestreetlawboard@umich.edu.  

  • Women Law Students Association

    The Women Law Students Association (WLSA) envisions a Law School community in which every woman is an equal member of the Michigan Law School both academically and socially, has the opportunity to meet and see positive female role models in the legal professions on a daily basis, is supported by other women in the Law School community and beyond, has opportunities for public action in the service of women, is prepared to assume any leadership role in society, and achieves her vision of success. Additionally, WLSA educates the Law School community on legal issues facing women throughout society including, but not limited to, sex discrimination, employment, health, education, violence, and access to resources. WLSA is committed to creating a Law School community centered on the pillars of Scholarship, Leadership, Mentorship, Camaraderie, and Service, and is open to all gender identities.

    To learn more about the Women Law Students Association, please contact us via email at wlsa_officers@umich.edu. You can also visit our Maize Page, or view our Constitution.